Athena's Web Weekly Column

Week of Jul 30th - Aug 5th,  2004

Yesterday and Today

Columns Archive

divider

  We have come to the conclusion of Homer's Iliad, and found it to be an excellent astrological primer. Most of the themes which were true three thousand years ago are still viable today. Homer arranged his work to match the seasons; linking Chapters I through XII to the twelve signs of the zodiac, and then repeating the entire process, such that Chapter II deals with Taurus, and Chapter XIV (two plus twelve) deals with Taurus again.
The Ram

The Ram

To briefly run through the order; in Chapter I, Aries is a sign which is short tempered and fueled by anger as Akhilleus and Agamemnon flip out at each other and set the stage for the poem. Our symbol emerges in Chapter XIII "...as a flock out of pasture follows a ram to drink..." In Chapter II, Taurus is "...as a great bull in his majesty towers supreme amid a grazing herd...", while Chapter XIV is seductive as Hera woos Zeus. Gemini's mental prowess is given to Odysseus in Chapter III, who "...could have no mortal rival as an orator", while in Chapter XV our air sign is underscored by the Cloudgatherer, for, "...lightly came his words upon the air." Cancer's love of food opens Chapter IV with all the gods gathered around, consuming the divine nectar and toasting one another, while in Chapter XVI, Patroklos weeps like a small girlchild, "...who runs beside her mother and cries and cries to be taken up..." Are there any who do not know this is the sign of motherhood?

Crying Child

Crying Child

  In Chapter V, Homer has us "...think of a lion...", while in Chapter XVII there are more references to the hearts and lions than in any other book. Yes, Leo rules lions and the heart. In Chapter VI the craft of Virgo emerges as women embroider, weave, carry water and engage Hektor, while in Chapter XVIII there are numerous references to the harvest in the scene depicted on the shield of Akhilleus. In Chapter VII, Hektor halts the battle and then personally challenges Aias, and the troops watch as the two are evenly matched and break off the fight at sundown. In Chapter XIX, Akhilleus and Agamemnon make peace between each other, mending the rift of Ch. I (martial Aries). In Chapter VIII, Zeus threatens any who oppose him as "...he will be flung out of Olympus into the murk of Tartaros that lies deep down in the underworld", while in Chapter XX, Hades fears that his graves will be ripped open, "...and the vile moldy kennels the gods hate might stand revealed to mortals and immortals..." In Chapter IX, our Sagittarian religious zeal emerges as Diomedes tells us that the Greeks "...came here under god," and in Chapter XXI the children of Zeus (Jupiter and the sky) are given heightened prominence.
Old Age

Old Age

In Chapter X, our Father Time Capricorn theme, Nestor's years, "...undeterred by doleful age," are the focus, while Old Priam and Hekabe attempt to move Hektor to pity with their old age in Chapter XXII. In Chapter XI, the stellar constellation of Aquarius, Hektor appears like a summer star, appearing and disappearing behind the clouds, while in Chapter XXIII, chums engage in the friendly competition of a Summer Olympics. Finally in Chapter XII, Pisces levels "...all by the blue running sea...", and in Chapter XXIV, Priam puts his life on the line by finding faith in God and surrendering to His will.

  Except for the ever-present battle, the personalities of the twelve are the same as they ever were, with the vacillations of Gemini, the passions of Scorpio, and the calamities of Capricorn.


divider